Feral Cat Hospice

Poor Nigel, he’s had a long life and fathered most of the feral cats that live in our colony. He was named by my neighbor and until then, we knew him as “the grey velour cat”. He is blind and needing to be close by because he could get lost going back and forth from our house to the neighbors. We would help him further but he won’t let us touch him and we don’t want to force him to do anything he doesn’t want at this point in his life. All we can do is feed him, try to keep him warm and comfortable and wait to see what happens. He is still eating so I don’t think he plans on dying soon.

0103161721b~2

The hard thing about having a feral colony is when one of them gets sick and they won’t let you help them. Most of our ferals will let you touch them but even if they do, anytime they have something wrong they get distant and we just have to watch to see if they get better.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Morning bird watching

image

Leave a comment

December 2, 2012 · 11:17 AM

The Office Chair Next to Me

This is what goes on while I’m working…LOL

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Kittens are Being Accepted by Their Housemates

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Marty Grooms the Kittens

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Cat Nap

Kittens taking a power nap

I can always tell when the kittens get sleepy they come find us and want to be picked up. Immediately they start purring and I know they are ready to go down for a nap. Their nighttime cage is in our office so they come down here to take their nap. They’re just like little kids sleeping wherever they fall down.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

New Kittens at Our House

Kittens in feral cage

Jim and I were on our way home from eating out the other night when he spotted something running across the parking lot. I immediately said don’t show me what it is it might be a cat. Never the less we drove over to where he had seen it and it turned out to be two small skinny kittens running around under a car. They looked and acted so frightened so we stopped to see if we could catch them. I sat on the ground and tried to coax them out from under the car. They seemed interested but too afraid to come out. I told Jim to go home and get our feral cage so we could trap them. While he was gone I saw a bag boy retrieving carts from the parking lot and motioned him to come over. I handed him some money and asked him to go in to the store and get some cat food so I could keep them there until Jim got back.

It seemed like forever until Jim returned. But it helped having the small bag of dry food to keep them interested enough to stay by me until he got back. By the time he got back they had let me pet them and actually hold them briefly. This told me they weren’t feral and someone had probably left them there. My heart sank as I thought of the cruelty of that act. How could anyone leave these helpless kittens in a parking lot where they could easily get run over or die of starvation. When Jim got back we put them into the feral cage and brought them home. We have a recovery cage that we keep the ferals in after surgery in the basement so that’s where they spent their first night with us. It’s been a week now and it’s becoming clear that these guys have found a home with us, we have become so attached to them.

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

Our treatment of animals is important to our own internal state. If we are to expand our horizons, to grow to understand what the relatedness of each and every thing means, then our love and appreciation of all life is essential. Our respect and reverence for all living things will be reflected in our own living. – Bill Schul (Author of The Psychic Power of Animals)

Leave a comment

Filed under Inside cats